Get Your Giddy On

There’s a razors edge of momentum that is both exciting and tilting known as giddy. It is an experience where the unknown, anticipation, trepidation and possibilities swirl together like a spiral of rainbows and snow flurries. Transitions, like the ones we experience at the ends and beginnings of years, or when we move to a new town, or change direction in our careers, or even the loss of a loved one are often saturated with giddy.

I’m suggesting that giddy – with muscle and intention – has great benefits and now, 2019, is a great time to start exercising that fresh muscle. The old adage, there is no time like the present, is the precursor to get your giddy on. Get your giddy on evaporates time and recognizes presence. Presence to the razor’s edge of life, and what brings you to the edge of your heart, your drive, and your purpose.

The last time I felt a surge of my giddy was driving and then walking to the entrance of the Concord public library. The public library is where I devote my energy to writing, more specifically, writing for the book about Somatic Finance®. Giddy feels electric, ecstatic, pure, fluid, a ginormous smile residing in my belly. Giddy is good for our soul, and it helps us gain perspective for how we center our plans, prioritize our actions, and optimize our energy.

When we get our giddy on, the potential to sustain giddy for ourselves and generate giddy for others expands. A few points to recognize about giddy…

  • Giddy is inside us
  • Giddy is linked to our unique way of being
  • Giddy often inspires generosity
  • Giddy may not make sense to others
  • Giddy can even scare others
  • Giddy is both personal and impersonal
  • Giddy is for us and yet gives beyond us

Are you familiar with giddy? If you read this message and shake your head, trying to figure “it” out, move to curiosity and practice. Practice getting your giddy on. First, ground and commit to giddy, and second, energize movement with your body to activate more awareness.

Commit to growing giddy. You may not know how, why, or what. In fact, committing to anything is necessary for the true how, why and what to reveal themselves. We really know very little when we commit!

Commit verbally and on paper. In simple form, “I commit to growing my giddy,” or more complex: “I commit to growing giddy to support my development and vibrant health.” Or, include a feeling state: “I feel uncertain and I commit to growing my giddy.” Trust the words and phrases that arise from your heart and mind. State them out loud. Write them down. Post your commitment in your environment.

Second, grow giddy with a daily practice a minimum of 2 times a day. In the morning, reflect for two minutes on your day ahead. Select two specific events of the day (e.g. a moment, project, meeting, conversation) to give unbridled attention to giddy – a state of newness, nowness, edginess, where you both know and do not know. You skate (perhaps very slowly) on the razor’s edge.

In these two moments, notice the interior of your body: 1) thoughts, 2) sensations in the form of pressure, temperature and movement, 3) body location and 4) emotional state. Rate on a scale of 1 to 10, your level of giddy.

At the end of the day, reflect back on your two moments, your experience, where your body is most and least alive when giddy, and your rating. Review and respond (in thought or writing) to the following wonder question:

I wonder what barriers to getting my giddy on want to be revealed and released?
I wonder how getting my giddy on serves my growth and how to magnetize giddy in my life?

At the end of the week, reflect on your practice experience and how your body plays a significant role (or not) in getting your giddy on.

Lastly, have some fun. There is much in the world to give our attention, that breaks our heart. And, the more we live fully in presence, the better equipped we are to meet each situation with our brilliant minds and open hearts.

Giddy up!

 

 

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